Healthy Teen Network

Is Everyone an Addict? Three Interesting Ways to Understand Addiction Culture

Addiction culture is when you believe that everyone is addicted to something—whether it be video games and sugar, or more serious substances, like alcohol and drugs. Everyone has their own method of coping with the stresses of everyday life.

However, if everyone is an addict of some kind, then when does addiction become unhealthy? Keep reading for three interesting ways to understand addiction culture, as well as a side note on how to prepare your children for addiction culture and peer pressure.

Addiction Has a Million Faces and Facets

Most people joke about addiction because they don’t see the word as something serious. They joke about being addicted to sugar, addicted to video games, addicted to daytime television…all of which are minor compared to what they view as real addictions. To most people, addiction involves drugs and alcohol. However, clinical research in psychiatry suggests that addictive behavior comes in many forms; ergo, a hobby or a passion could easily become an unhealthy addiction.

Environment Matters More Than Genetics When It Comes to Hereditary Addictive Behavior

Sure, genetics play a role in addictive behaviors, but that doesn’t mean all people born to addiction-riddled families are doomed to repeat their parents’ mistakes. In fact, addictions are, for the most part, environment-based.

For instance, if a baby is born to parents that were once addicted to drugs but have been clean and sober for years, that child isn’t raised around what could be addictive. It’s talked about but not present in their everyday lives; ergo, they have better odds of saying no to addictive substances later in life.

Addictions Vary in Severity Based on Social Stigma

Addictive behaviors often start off innocently with tries. Someone offers you drugs at a party with the promise that it’s a mellow high. All of the sudden, you’re hooked for years afterwards. It doesn’t always end that way, but social stigma plays a HUGE role in addictions. Peer pressure is absolutely a real and prevalent force throughout someone’s life—not just in school.

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